#365papers June Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

This month’s reading has not been great – in order to get the 30 papers for June read to the level I wanted to, I ended up dedicating a few days at the end of the month to get them all complete. This month has been a busy one; I went to Evidence Live for 2 days (blog posts here for day 1 and day 2), and this month seems to have been really heavy with meetings. July is looking a bit quieter so fingers crossed I won’t end up cramming at the end of next month too!

June’s reading:

  1. Can we rely on the best trial? A comparison of individual trials and systematic reviews
  2. Science in the social media age
  3. Communicating data about the benefits and harms of treatment: A randomised trial
  4. Tweeting and rule breaking at conferences
  5. Evolution of poor reporting and inadequate methods over time in 20,920 randomised controlled trials included in Cochrane reviews: research on research study
  6. How scientists engage the public
  7. Influence of social media on the dissemination of a traditional surgical research article
  8. Recruiting adolescent research participants: in-person compared to social media approaches
  9. How are scientists using social media in the workplace?
  10. Through the looking glass: understanding non-inferiority
  11. The need for consensus, consistency, and core outcome sets in perioperative research
  12. Bias due to changes in specified outcomes during the systematic review process
  13. Confidence intervals illuminate absence of evidence
  14. Research funders pledge to make trial results publicly available
  15. US to impose tougher rules on reporting clinical trial data
  16. A methodological approach for assessing the uptake of core outcome sets using clinicaltrials.gov: findings from a review of randomised controlled trials of rheumatoid arthritis
  17. Anonymising and sharing individual patient data
  18. How to translate clinical trial results into gain in healthy life expectancy for individual patients
  19. Sparse data bias: a problem hiding in plain sight
  20. Exploring patients’ treatment journeys following randomisation in mental health trials to improve future trial conduct: a synthesis of multiple qualitative data sets
  21. What do usability evaluators do in practice? An explorative study of think-aloud testing
  22. Getting access to what goes on in people’s heads? Reflection on the think-aloud technique
  23. Think-aloud protocols: a comparison of three think-aloud protocols for use in testing data-dissemination web sites for usability
  24. Evidence based medicine manifesto for better healthcare
  25. Thinking aloud: Reconciling theory and practice
  26. Barriers to participation in randomised controlled trials: a systematic review
  27. Clinical trials: the challenge of recruitment and retention of participants
  28. Increasing recruitment to randomised trials: a review of randomised controlled trials
  29. Principles of recruitment and retention in clinical trials
  30. Engaging veterans with substance abuse disorders into a research trial: success with study branding, networking, and presence
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