#365papers May Update

In my first post on this blog, I set myself 3 PhD-related goals for 2017. One of those goals was to read more widely, and more frequently, and I decided that doing the #365papers challenge would be a good way to do that.

This month’s reading has been pretty rubbish if I’m honest. I’ve been spending my spare time reading books with plots and characters instead of p values and methods, and whilst in PhD mode I’ve been working on writing up the systematic review chapter of my thesis. Last month I was all motivated and excited to write my literature review – that took a total back seat, and I suspect it will remain there for the next few weeks whilst I finish up a first draft of that thesis chapter. I’m super excited to get this chapter written – I think it’ll calm me down a bit when it comes to writing the thesis as a whole; it feels like a head-start, and mentally, I think that’s a good move. Anyway, I managed to get through May’s reading, but that did involve a pretty heft few days of reading towards the end to catch up.

May’s reading:

  1. The impact of advertising patient and public involvement on trial recruitment: embedded cluster randomised recruitment trial
  2. Novel participatory methods of involving patients in research: naming and branding a longitudinal cohort study, BRIGHTLIGHT
  3. Developing the SELF study: a focus group with patients and the public
  4. What can we learn from trial decliners about improving recruitment? Qualitative study
  5. Overcoming barrier to recruiting ethnic minorities to mental health research: a typology of recruitment strategies
  6. Systematic techniques for assisting recruitment to trials (START): developing the science of recruitment
  7. Testing the effectiveness of user-tested patient information on recruitment rates across multiple trials: meta-analysis of data from the START programme
  8. Challenges to evaluating complex interventions: a content analysis of published papers
  9. An optimised patient information sheet did not significantly increase recruitment or retention in a falls prevention study: an embedded randomised recruitment trial
  10. Sharing individual level data from observational studies and clinical trials: a perspective from NHLBI
  11. Data sharing: not as simple as it seems
  12. Protecting patient privacy when sharing patient-level data from clinical trials
  13. Predictors of clinical trial data sharing: exploratory analysis of a cross-sectional survey
  14. Opening clinical trial data: are the voluntary data-sharing portals enough?
  15. Subversion of allocation concealment in randomised controlled trial: a historical case study
  16. Making a decision about trial participation: the feasibility of measuring deliberation during the informed consent process for clinical trials
  17. Participants’ preference for type of leaflet used to feed back the results of a randomised trial: a survey
  18. Trialists should tell participants results, but how?
  19. HELP! Problems in executing a pragmatic, randomised, stepped wedge trial on the Hospital Elder Life Program to prevent delirium in older patients
  20. Clinician engagement is critical to public engagement with clinical trials
  21. Patient engagement in research: a systematic review
  22. Health researchers’ attitudes towards public involvement in health research
  23. Open clinical trial data for all? A view from regulators
  24. Patient and public involvement: what next for the NHS?
  25. ‘Ordinary people only’: knowledge, representativeness, and the publics of public participation in healthcare
  26. Reflections on health care consumerism: insights from feminism
  27. Publishing information about ongoing clinical trials for patients
  28. Effectiveness of strategies for information, educating and involving patients
  29. Patient involvement in patient safety: what factors influence patient participation and engagement?
  30. Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media: the ‘Get Randomised’ campaign
  31. Communicating the results of clinical research to participants: attitudes, practices, and future directions
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