An Evening With Bill Nye – Portland, Oregon

Last night I went to see Bill Nye Live in Portland. If you were at school in the 1990s, you probably recognise that name from the TV show ‘Bill Nye the Science Guy’ – it ran between 1993 and 1998 saved many, many science teachers from terrible hangovers as Bill took over teaching for a lesson.

Now, Bill Nye is not only a science educator – he’s the CEO of the Planetary Society, he provided consultancy on scientific matters to Barrack Obama when he was in office (ahh, the good old days..), he’s written multiple books, and he’s even been on Dancing with the Stars. Most relevant to last night’s event is that’s he’s a board member of the Mount St. Helens Institute, a non-profit aiming to ‘advance understanding and stewardship of the Earth through science, education, and exploration of volcanic landscapes’.

Ticket sales for ‘Bill Nye Live: An Evening of Seismic Importance’ were in support of the Mount St Helens Institute, and on the 38th anniversary of its eruption, Bill Nye and the Institute aimed to educate and entertain on the topic of climate change, the effects of the 1998 eruption, and how we can all work together to, quite literally, save the world.

I wasn’t really sure what to expect from the event in terms of the level of seriousness in the way the content was presented – Bill Nye has always been funny, but this topic is serious, especially given that it was in honour of the 38th anniversary of the Mount St Helens eruption. 57 people died as a result of the eruption, so I was a bit weary of Bill’s jokey side.

To be honest, there were parts of Bill’s presentation that did make me feel a bit uncomfortable. I agreed with just about everything that he said, but the way that he repeatedly described the eruption as ‘amazing’, whilst only mentioning the victims of it once or twice, and in quite derogatory ways (Harry Truman was one resident who refused to leave despite being told to evacuate the Mount St Helens site; he was killed by the pyroclastic flow that overtook his lodge and buried the site under 150ft of volcanic debris), didn’t sit well with me. I get that he was playing things up for the audience, but Mount St Helens is less than 2 hours away, and given that the eruption was only 38 years ago, it’s feasible that people can remember the devastation that it caused; it seemed insensitive.

Mount St Helens before and after the 1980 eruption.

That said, overall I thought the event was really well done. The audience was very mixed – lots of families with very young children, large groups of adults and older couples wanting to learn more about the volcano, so I thought the way Bill managed to communicate such complicated science was brilliant. I’m not a geologist, and haven’t studied volcanoes since I was about 12 (I think it was in a Geography class with a teacher I didn’t like..), and I followed the graphs and statistics that were presented pretty easily. There was a young boy sat next to me who seemed to follow along easily enough too, and as we got up to leave I heard him say to his Mum, ‘how do you be a geologist then?’ which was a heart-warming end to the evening.

Find out more about the Mount St Helens Institute here, and watch Bill Nye’s latest Netflix series ‘Bill Nye Saves the World’ here.

Book Review – Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick by Maya Dusenbery

I wasn’t planning on doing a dedicated book review post for this book – I just fancied reading it. After the first 3 pages I was already frustrated and angry enough that I was ready to throw the book across the room; not because it’s poorly written, far from it, it’s the contents of the pages that annoyed me so much. I hope that this post encourages some of you to read this book, it covers a topic I knew nothing about to begin with, and does a brilliant job of making a complex web of scientific research projects – reasons behind them, the errors they contain, and the source of the funding that enabled them to happen – accessible and easy to digest. Get Maya Dusenbery’s Doing Harm, here.

What the publisher says

Editor of the award-winning site Feministing.com, Maya Dusenbery brings together scientific and sociological research, interviews with doctors and researchers, and personal stories from women across the country to provide the first comprehensive, accessible look at how sexism in medicine harms women today.

In Doing Harm, Dusenbery explores the deep, systemic problems that underlie women’s experiences of feeling dismissed by the medical system. Women have been discharged from the emergency room mid-heart attack with a prescription for anti-anxiety meds, while others with autoimmune diseases have been labeled “chronic complainers” for years before being properly diagnosed. Women with endometriosis have been told they are just overreacting to “normal” menstrual cramps, while still others have “contested” illnesses like chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia that, dogged by psychosomatic suspicions, have yet to be fully accepted as “real” diseases by the whole of the profession.

An eye-opening read for patients and health care providers alike, Doing Harm shows how women suffer because the medical community knows relatively less about their diseases and bodies and too often doesn’t trust their reports of their symptoms. The research community has neglected conditions that disproportionately affect women and paid little attention to biological differences between the sexes in everything from drug metabolism to the disease factors–even the symptoms of a heart attack. Meanwhile, a long history of viewing women as especially prone to “hysteria” reverberates to the present day, leaving women battling against a stereotype that they’re hypochondriacs whose ailments are likely to be “all in their heads.”

Offering a clear-eyed explanation of the root causes of this insidious and entrenched bias and laying out its sometimes catastrophic consequences, Doing Harm is a rallying wake-up call that will change the way we look at health care for women.

What the critics say

“Maya Dusenbery brings new life to one of the most urgent yet under-discussed feminist issues of our time. Anyone who cares about women’s health needs to read this book.” (Jessica Valenti, author of Sex Object: A Memoir)

“In this groundbreaking book, Dusenbery shows how the same forces that hold women back in society more broadly lead to subpar medical care and inadequate attention to health issues that impact women. Every doctor, scientist, and health care provider and researcher should read this book. And so should every woman.” (Jill Filipovic, author of The H-Spot: The Feminist Pursuit of Happiness)

“Maya Dusenbery’s exhaustively researched book is equal parts infuriating and energizing. No woman will see the medical establishment and – perhaps even more profound – her own body the same way after reading it. In a just world, it would be required reading in medical schools from this day forward.” (Courtney E. Martin, author of The New Better Off: Reinventing the American Dream.

My thoughts

I started this book on a flight to Brussels during my week off – and almost immediately starting to quote bits of it to my friend who was sat next to me, “Did you know that in American medical faculties there’s a gender pay gap of $20,000?”, “Oh my God, you know that aspirin study that led to doctors advising people over the age of 50 to take an aspirin a day to lower the risk of heart attacks? THE STUDY WAS ONLY DONE ON MEN INITIALLY! Then, when there was another study done on women, the results were not the same, yet the advice has stayed constant!”, “HOLY SHIT, WOMEN ARE 50-75% MORE LIKELY THAN MEN TO HAVE ADVERSE REACTIONS TO DRUGS BECAUSE THE MAJORITY OF DRUGS HAVE ONLY BEEN TESTED ON MEN!!”

You can imagine how bad the shouting and swearing got as I progressed through the book.

The book itself is split into three parts; ‘Part 1 – Overlooked and Dismissed: A Systemic Problem’, ‘Part 2 – Invisible Women in a ‘Male Model’ System’, and ‘Part 3 – Neglected Diseases: The Disorders Formerly Known as Hysteria’, and when I read the contents I was immediately intrigued by Part 1 over the other 2. After reading, I think I enjoyed that section the most, but Parts 2 and 3 were the areas that cemented my anger – they were the areas where Dusenbery was able to really drill down into the research; they provided the ammunition to back up the anger she’d fuelled in Part 1.

Honestly, towards the middle of Part 2 I was starting to feel pretty hopeless; how on Earth could we have built a medical system on a foundation of research that was conducted almost entirely on male participants? Even down to the fact that lab research has been found to be conducted on mainly male rats and mice, not female (or God forbid, and equal split)?! Urgggghhh. Anyway, the most I read, the more frustrated I got – until that frustration turned to wanting to do something about the issue of bias in medical research.
I hope that this book stays with me and influences the work that I do over the course of my career; I want to remain in the clinical trials methodology field after my PhD is complete, and bearing the issues described by Dusenbery in mind will mean I can contribute at least in some small part, to alleviating these problems.

Would I recommend it?

10000000% yes. Read it, gift it, take it to medical appointments with you, fold the corners of pages that contain topics that infuriate you, and please, please, spread awareness of the fact that medical research has, and continues to fail women.

Some Things I Learned From Taking a #DigitalDetox

Helloooooo internet! It’s weird being back after that little break I had. After a really hectic week back at work it almost feels like I never took the break at all, but I have kept up some of the habits I developed over the course of the week and I’ve felt much more able to deal with my workload. I figured it might be helpful to share those with you.
For anyone that is super stressed out, feeling a bit anxious or unmotivated (Katie’s most recent post is what triggered me to write this one..), these tips are really simple and should hopefully help.

Disclaimer: Some of these tips are embarrassingly simple, so much so that I’m shocked that I didn’t implement them earlier on in this PhD process. Still, if I wasn’t doing them before then I’d guess that lots of other PhD students aren’t doing them now.

1. Turn your notifications off

Before last week just about every app on my phone had notifications switched on; WhatsApp, Facebook, Facebook Messenger, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Goodreads, WordPress, Etsy, the news, even when Podcasts updated each week. I (naively) didn’t think that these notifications had much of an impact on me, but switching them off has cleared out a tonne of background noise that I didn’t even realise was there. Previously, there were always notifications waiting for me on my phone, always something to think about, catch up on, acknowledge. Now, there’s nothing. Obviously I get texts and calls like normal, but notifications from apps are strictly off. I check apps when I have time to deal with the stuff that they contain, rather than constantly being aware of what I need to deal with later on in the day. Terrifyingly simple, shockingly effective.

2. Stop checking your email all the time

As with notifications, my emails are on my iPhone (seriously, iPhones are the best and worst things ever), so with one quick click and swipe I’d have checked emails from my personal account, my work account, and the account I have that’s based with one of my freelance clients. It was pretty rare that there were no emails in any of those 3 accounts; now let’s be clear, I’m not saying I’m super popular or important, 80% of those emails were likely from mailing lists or companies trying to get me to buy stuff, but still. Not checking emails was the thing I found most difficult last week – I’m a big fan of getting, and staying, at inbox zero, and I knew in the back of my mind that when I went back that would not be the case. I stuck with it though, and I check them much less often now – I’m not important enough for the world to implode if someone needs to wait an extra hour or two to get a reply from me, and it clears up head space and helps me to stay focussed on what I’m actually doing.

3. If it takes less than 5 minutes, do it now

Previously, my to do list was clogged up with tiny, tiny things. ‘Book dentist appointment’, ‘sort laundry out’, ‘clear desk’, ‘go to the Post Office’, ‘print handouts for talk’, ‘make Doodle poll for meeting’ etc etc – these things are the easiest wins to make on a to do list, so I would allow them to build up and then do them as a form of ‘productive procrastination’. No longer! Holy cow, last week I got through all these tiny little things and my to do list is about a third of the length it once was – and it’s staying that way. If it takes less than 5 minutes, it gets done there and then. This not only means I’m getting more stuff done, but it removes the clutter from a to do list and enables me to focus on the stuff I actually have to do; i.e. write thesis.

I need this print from Sighh Designs.
4. Empty time is not wasted time
How could any of my time be wasted with this little pup around? (Note – that is the feeling of true joy you see on my face).

At this point I need to get this sentence tattooed on my arm. Or printed across my laptop screen, whatever. I was thinking about what I’d done with my week off, and I couldn’t remember what I’d done on Monday and Tuesday. All I could think was that I’d looked after Milo (excellent puppy that I’ve been borrowing), given myself a pedicure, got a hair cut, read my book and watched Netflix (if you haven’t watched Queer Eye yet then oh my god, it’s the best feel good TV ever, it totally didn’t make me cry, nope not at all). That small list of things was all that I did over 2 days, and it was bloody brilliant. I just had a slow few days, I wasn’t running around like a headless chicken trying to get emails sent or writing done – it was totally relaxed. This week when I came back to work I was able to work way more efficiently so that I could then take some time away at lunch, or finish work and not be glued to my laptop long into the evening.

So yep, that’s it! I’m back and feeling super motivated for the next 10 weeks or so. Yhere is so much happening, but I’m feeling excited for it rather than nervous or anxious, it looks like that little break did exactly what I needed it to do – hoorah!

I’m Taking a Week’s Holiday 11 Weeks Before My Thesis Is Due

As you’re reading this, it’s 11 weeks until I submit my PhD thesis. 11 weeks. A decent amount of time, but it’s becoming more real by the day now. I’m writing this post in advance and scheduling it to be posted – I’m taking a break. From Monday 9th April until Monday 16th April I will be intentionally forgetting about my thesis, turning all notifications off on my phone, and logging out of Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

I am taking an entire week to sort my head out. I’ve mentioned before that I have depression, and I really didn’t realise how how much of an impact that writing my thesis would have on my mental health. It’s not that I’ve been particularly ‘depressed’ if you know what I mean, I’ve just been a bit mopey for a few weeks; nothing major, just a bit numb and unmotivated. I’m getting better at recognising when things aren’t feeling so good, and now is one those times when I need a bit of time to myself.

I miss the feeling of being super motivated and excited to sit down and write (honestly, that was a thing a few months ago!), and this week’s holiday has come at the perfect time. I’d booked it off ages ago because I’m going to see Bastille in Edinburgh on Wednesday night (a Christmas present from my boyfriend), and then I’m going to Brussels with my best friend Friday to Monday to see Air Traffic. Initially I’d thought about just taking the days off that I needed to, but the past few weeks have made it really clear that I need to take the full week.  I need some time to sort my head out so that I can finish the PhD with the same feelings of motivation and enthusiasm that I started with. I want my thesis to be the best piece of writing I can possibly produce, and my brain is too mushy to do it justice right now.

This week I’m avoiding the internet, I’m unchaining myself from my desk and I’m going to have an entire week of doing stuff that I enjoy. Catch up with friends, read, go to the cinema, do some yoga, cook food from scratch (I’m an expert in Tesco ready meals at this point), spend time with my partner (this guy genuinely deserves a medal, I have been a true JOY to live with for the past few weeks), and actually make time to find out how my best friend’s first teaching job is going (I have been the worst friend recently, sorry everyone).

Credit: Pauline Kebuck

There will be no more blog posts from me for the next little while – I’ll be back once my head is feeling less like cotton wool and my thesis is feeling more like it will be something that I’m really proud of when it’s done.

Thesis Writing Full Time #3: No Pressure, No Work

This is a super quick check-in so that I can look back at the poor choices I have made with regards to time allocation when I’m stress-crying in the middle of June.

I’m at the point of thesis writing now where I really, really need someone to shout at me and force me to write. See my last thesis update post to see just how brilliant I’ve become at procrastination…
I’ve always been someone that works to a deadline, and if there is no pressure to get things done then I tend to leave work until the last minute. Saying that, I always get the work done – I’ve never missed a deadline – it just makes period of time closest to the deadline unnecessarily stressful.

This week instead of doing all of the thesis writing, I’ve done a million other things; so not entirely unproductive. I’ve been doing some work for Soapbox Science’s first event in Aberdeen, organising training and scouting out suppliers for various things  – finding a joiner to make 4 wooden soapboxes to very specific measurements and a limited budget is not the easiest of tasks. I also gave a talk about blogging for the University of Aberdeen’s Qualitative Research Network, and I’ve been doing some serious travel research for my Winston Churchill Memorial Fellowship (I know, it’s a tough life..).

Over the next few weeks I’m going to take part in some #remoteretreats. I think that will help me to focus. In the grand scheme of things I don’t actually have a huge amount of work left to do; the majority of the words are written, it’s about improving them and making sure all of the loose ends are tied up now.

Credit: Anna Borges / Buzzfeed